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 Background

 The systems I own

 Current Projects

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Background

The future of videogames looked bleak. The catastrophic crash of 1984 had wiped out or severely weakened all the major home videogame companies, and home computers were getting more and more popular. It seemed as if the home videogame system would become a thing of the past.

After the crash, only two companies were making any serious effort at selling videogames. INTV (the company that owned rights to the intelliviosn) and a Japanese company named Nintendo. Nintendo started out in 1889 as a playing card company and started getting into videogames in the early 80's, producing hits like Donkey Kong and Mario Brothers. Their Famicom videogame system had done pretty well in Japan, selling 2.5 million systems in 1984. After negotiations with Atari to sell the Famicom in the U.S. fell through, Nintendo decided to release the system in the states on their own in 1985, ignoring the weak videogame market and the recent crash.

Selling the system to American retailers wasn't easy. Most were hesitant to buy videogame systems after the crash of the entire market just a year ago and didn't want to get burned. So Nintendo took steps to make the system seem less like a videogame system and more like a computer or a VCR. They called the U.S. version of the Famicom the Nintendo Entertainment System, and designed it to look less like a videogame console and more like something that would fit in with other home entertainment appliances. Nintendo even agreed to buy back all unsold inventory in order to get retailers to take a chance on them. The system was originally targeted for release in spring '85, but the release date was pushed back. After test-marketing in the New York City area in late fall, the system was released nationwide in February, 1986.

Nintendo released the NES in two different bundles: one at $249 with the R.O.B. (Robotic Operating Buddy) unit, controllers, a lightgun, Gyromite (a R.O.B. game), Duck Hunt, and Super Mario Bros., and the other at $199 with controllers and Super Mario Bros. The NES was a huge success and was soon outselling competing systems (which at the time was only the INTV, the SMS, and the Atari 7800) by a ten-to-one ratio.

Nintendo had learned from the mistakes of its predecessors, and instituted a very strict licensing system for third party game developers (see below).

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The systems I own

Nintendo Entertainment System NES, Released 1985

Click here to see my cartridge collection.

Top-loading NES, Released ????

No Picture yet

Super NES , Released 19??.

UFORCE, Released 19??

Allows controlling the game with no physical controller for the NES.

Video Shooter, Release 19??

Cordless infrared gun for the NES.

 

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Current Projects

None at this time.

 

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Favorite Links

To be added

 

   

 

 

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Last Revised: December 24, 1999

  This page had been reviewed 1792since Dec. 24, 1999